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Abekas Tria Debuts at Winter Olympics in Sochi

February 25, 2014

NBC Olympics has delivered outstanding coverage from Sochi, the host city for the XXII Winter Olympic games. It’s not just the athletes that have broken records; NBC has produced some very impressive numbers too: 539 hours of television coverage across five channels, and over 1,000 hours of live streaming of every event except for the Opening Ceremony.

NBC Studio A in the International Broadcast Center at Sochi. Abekas Mira video servers fed all the on-set displays throughout the games.

NBC Studio A in the International Broadcast Center at Sochi. Abekas Mira video servers fed all the on-set displays throughout the games.

NBC Olympics occupied the largest footprint inside the 500,000 ft2 International Broadcast facility built at Sochi. In addition to the two principal studios at Sochi, NBC also operated satellite facilities at other venues for the games including the Sanki Sliding Center—host of the bobsleigh, skeleton and luge competitions. NBC Sports also employed their new facility in Stamford, CT where much of the live commentating and highlights packages were produced.

Abekas was well represented at the Olympics again this winter and Tria saw its inaugural games just a year after its introduction. There was an eight-channel Mira in Control Room A, providing video from the main studio. The Mira server supplied six channels of looping monitor fill and graphic elements to the on-set displays.  Two additional Mira channels were employed to provide video+key of a moving split screen bar, controlled by the seamless interface between Mira and the Sony MVS7000 switcher.  Studio B, supported by Control Room B, housed a three-channel Tria server, providing on-set background loops.

Based on the design of the control rooms in their new Stamford, CT broadcast center, NBC Sports established a remote production studio at the Sanki Sliding Center. This was the first time, at an Olympics, that broadcast production has occurred away from the IBC. The control room at Sanki employed a three-channel Tria; the V+K channel provided animated transitions, controlled via VDCP from the Sony MVS 6350 switcher, while two additional video channels fed on-set displays.  The highly flexible media import tools of Tria were also used to transcode MOV files with an alpha channel.

We’re pleased to say all the Abekas video servers functioned flawlessly and received high praise from hard-working TDs throughout the games.